Archive for the ‘SAFETY SECURITY SPYING’ Category

The pocket radar: Get ready for phones that can look through walls

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

How the $149 Walabot is already sparking the interest of developers, who plan to use it for everything from collision detection in cars to honing their martial arts skills

walabot-pocket-radar-image www.freepnonelink.net

The Walabot Pro.
Image: Vayyar Imaging

Fancy looking through walls using your phone? Well soon it will be possible using a handheld radar.

The Walabot is a radar unit that attaches to smartphones and can be used to scan the world around you.

While radar-imaging technology typically costs at least thousands of dollars, the cheapest Walabot will cost $149, thanks to Vayyar Imaging shrinking the necessary technology down to a phone-sized system on a chip.

As proof of what the Walabot can do, the Pro version of the device will come with an Android app that can peer through walls — allowing the user to find pipes and wires, for instance.

“Since Walabot can sense minute changes and very small movement, you’ll be able to see when pipes are dripping and other problems,” said Raviv Melamed, CEO and co-founder of Vayyar Imaging.

The device can see through about 7cm to 10cm of concrete, enough to allow it to look through a typical wall and can penetrate more deeply through less-dense obstacles, such as drywall. Melamed says Walabot can see through almost any material other than metal, which Melamed describes as the Walabot’s kryptonite.

walabot.jpg
An Android app uses the Walabot’s radar to see pipes through a section of wall.
Image: Nick Heath / TechRepublic

But the uses of the technology go far beyond locating a leaking pipe, Melamed foresees a host of applications being developed for the device after it launches at the end of April. These apps will not only take advantage of Walabot’s ability to “see” through solid objects, but to track people and objects in 3D space.

For instance, collision detection and avoidance in vehicles — with a Walabot-connected app letting you know when you get too close to the car in front.

“You could put this on the dashboard connected to your phone and get an alert.”

Smart homes could be another potential use, with the Walabot providing the imaging for an app that watches over people and things. The Walabot attaches to the back of the phone via magnets but it could be attached to any metallic surface in a home, such as a fridge or air-conditioning unit, and paired with a small computer such as the Raspberry Pi. Melamed gives the example of how the technology could help an app spot when an elderly person had had a fall and was unable to move.

“People fall in their bedroom or in the shower and these are places where you cannot put cameras. For example, I would love to have something that tracked my mother or father without compromising their privacy.”

If the Walabot is pointing at a person the device is sensitive enough that it can track a person’s breathing, for instance, letting you know if someone is in a particular room. That person’s breathing is detected by measuring the movement of the person’s chest, which the Walabot captures by detecting radio waves that it bounces off the person’s body. When used in open space, the Walabot can detect people and things over a range of about four to five metres.

The device is even sensitive enough to measure a person’s heartbeat, said Melamed, by detecting blood vessels pulsing under the surface of the skin.

Intelligent cities are at the forefront of the next wave of the Internet of Things. The goals are to streamline communication and improve the lives of citizens. And save a little money along the way.

These are some of the obvious uses for Walabot, but Melamed says “there are so many things you can do with this technology”, which Vayyar Imaging hopes will emerge once developers get their hands on the device.

“You could do a lot of things with Walabot and there are a lot of smart people out there who should come up with some crazy ideas to play around with.”

Developers are already coming up with ideas Vayyar Imaging would never have thought of – for example, someone from Norway plans to use it to check which logs will burn best in their fireplace by scanning them to detect differing moisture levels. Another developer wants to use Walabot to measure the speed of his kicks when he practices martial arts.

“You can just go wild with it,” said Melamed.

One of the most difficult things to see through is human skin, according to Vayyar Imaging. Even though the technology Walabot relies on was originally developed to detect breast cancer, Walabot’s makers don’t recommend using the device to carry out medical examinations.

“Walabot is not a medical tool, it’s mainly for makers to play around with.”

When it comes to safety, the electromagnetic frequency of Walabot’s radar is “close to that” typically used by wi-fi, said Melamed, but “we are sending signals using more than 1,000-times less power than your wi-fi”.

What is the Walabot?

While Walabot’s imaging capabilities may sound similar to those of Microsoft Kinect, the technology works in a fundamentally different way. While the Kinect uses infra-red scanning to map 3D spaces, the Walabot uses radar to detect people and objects. This contrasting approach means the devices have differing strengths. Whereas the Walabot has a higher detection range and can penetrate solid objects, said Melamed, the Kinect can map 3D objects in finer detail, as the resolution of the captured image is higher.

“When you go further away from the Kinect the resolution gets worse. Where Kinect ends, this starts. So these are very complementary.”

To get the Walabot’s radar technology into a low-cost device the size of a smartphone, Vayyar Imaging developed a “very complex” system-on-a-chip for collecting and handling the radar data. This is paired with a set of algorithms that analyse and make sense of the radar data and also compensate for the distortion caused by Walabot’s casing.

Walabot will cost between $149 and $599, depending on the model. The three models differ in the number of antennas and the range of data they make available to developers via an API. Walabot’s four APIs will expose various data derived from the radar signals, such as 2D range and direction tracking and movement sensing, as well as, for the top-end model, offering access to the raw radar data and spatial sensing in 3D.

“We’re trying to provide a full breadth [of data] so people at all levels can play with it,” said Melamed.

The $599 Pro version is aimed at high-end users, such as businesses or research institutions. “Basically it’s like a lab that lets you do whatever you want,” said Melamed, recommending this model for uses such as collision avoidance, robotic guidance and 3D tracking.

The Walabot will last one to two hours on a single charge and the company are also planning to release a version with an attached battery.

When used with its demo apps, the Walabot can be set up quickly, for example, the Android wall scanning app that comes with the Pro version takes about four seconds to be ready to use.

However, despite shipping with this sample app, the Walabot is primarily aimed at developers who want to build their own applications around it. The Walabot connects to computers and phones via a Micro-USB cable. Various SDKs will be available, initially an Android SDK for the C++/Java programming languages, followed by a C#/VB/C++ SDK for Windows and a C++ SDK for Linux.

The first Walabot devices will ship to Europe from the end of April and the documentation for the API launches today. The Walabot is expected to be available in the US from about mid-May, as the Walabot, while having passed FCC tests, is waiting for official certification.

ubytkjt

Henry Sapiecha

How To Unlock A Phone – Use it with any SIM card

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015

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Henry Sapiecha

IPHONE USB CHARGER CAN BE USED TO HACK INTO YOUR IPHONE SAY SECURITY RESEARCHERS

Monday, June 10th, 2013

APPLE IPHONES AT RISK VIA SECURITY ISSUE WITH ITS USB IPHONE CHARGER

APPLE IPHONE PAIR IMAGE www.freephonelink.net

Three computer security researchers say they have worked out how to hack into iPhones and iPads through a USB charger.

Chengyu Song and Yeongjin Jang, doctoral students at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US, and Billy Lau, a staff researcher at the institute’s college of computing, said they were able to bypass Apple software security and install ”arbitrary software”, including malware, allowing potential attackers to hack in.

“Despite the plethora of defense mechanisms in iOS, we successfully injected arbitrary software into current-generation Apple devices running the latest operating system (OS) software,” reads the description of the researchers’ speech. “All users are affected, as our approach requires neither a jailbroken device nor user interaction.”

The malware is reportedly hard to detect, hiding in the iPhone’s software in the same manner that Apple’s pre-installed apps do. Once the charger is plugged in, it can infect the iPhone in less than one minute.

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The malicious charger uses BeagleBoard, a $US45 open-source hardware single-board computer. The researchers said they chose BeagleBoard to demonstrate the ease of building malicious chargers that look innocent enough to trick most consumers.

The three plan to discuss their work, which the college says was done in the name of enhancing security, at the Black Hat computer security conference in Las Vegas next month.

It’s unclear how serious or widespread the threat is to Apple mobile device users. ”We have notified Apple of the specifics of our work and wish to give the company adequate time to consider our findings,” the college said.

Apple products have had a reputation for less vulnerability to hackers and viruses in the past. This year, the company tightened security to block unauthorised changes to iCloud and iTunes accounts.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution and agencies

DFUTER
Henry Sapiecha
black diamonds on white line

THOSE PRIVATE IPHONE PICS YOU HAVE ARE NOT SAFE FROM HACKERS

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

SO YOU THINK THE PHOTOS YOU HAVE ON YOUR IPHONE ARE PRIVATE?

SAN FRANCISCO: The private photos on your phone may not be as private as you think.

Developers of applications for Apple’s mobile devices, along with Apple itself, came under scrutiny this month after reports that some apps were taking people’s address book information without their knowledge.

As it turns out, address books are not the only things up for grabs.

Photos are also vulnerable. After a user allows an application on an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch to have access to location information, the app can copy the user’s entire photo library, without any further notification or warning, according to app developers.

It is unclear whether any apps in Apple’s App Store are illicitly copying user photos.

Although Apple’s rules do not specifically forbid photo copying, Apple says it screens all apps submitted to the store, a process that should catch nefarious behaviour on the part of developers.

But copying address book data was against Apple’s rules, and the company approved many popular apps that collected that information.

Apple did not respond to a request for comment.

The first time an application wants to use location data, for mapping or any other purpose, Apple’s devices ask the user for permission, noting in a pop-up message that approval “allows access to location information in photos and videos.”

When the devices save photo and video files, they typically include the coordinates of the place they were taken — creating another potential risk.

On phones and tablets running Google’s Android software, apps must ask for approval before transmitting any photos.

On Apple devices, full access to the photo library was first permitted in 2010 when Apple released the fourth version of iOS. The change was intended to make photo apps more efficient.

The knowledge that this capability exists is not new, developers say, but it was assumed that Apple would ensure that apps that inappropriately exploited it did not make it into the App Store. Based on recent revelations, phone owners cannot be sure.

“Apple has a tremendous responsibility as the gatekeeper to the App Store and the apps people put on their phone to police the apps,” said David Jacobs, a fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Centre.

“Apple and app-makers should be making sure people understand what they are consenting to. It is pretty obvious that they aren’t doing a good enough job of that.”

GUKYGT

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha
www.intelagencies.com

SMART PHONES-IPHONES-ANDROIDS NOW EASILY HACKED BY AVAILABLE SOFTWARE

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

HACKING INTO IPHONES ANDROIDS & SMART PHONES IS EASY

The security threat to mobile devices is now very real and there is a wave of new exploits that has allowed hackers to eavesdrop on smartphones – even when you’re not connected to a phone call, writes Lia Timson.

Phone crashing regularly? Strange SMS bothering you for an update or a juicy link? It’s time to wise up to mobile malware.

Security experts have shown that iPhones and Android phones are quite vulnerable to the same type of “drive-by” attacks that have long plagued PC users.

A team of researchers infected a Google Android smartphone overnight, live, in front of a packed audience of computer security buffs to prove how mobile malware is now on the cusp of the big time, after so many years of unfulfilled predictions.

George Kurtz, co-author of Hacking Exposed, former McAfee security champion and now at the helm of CrowdStrike alongside Dmitri Alperovitch, demonstrated how the team designed a smartphone remote access tool (RAT) and eavesdrop operation.

They then set about buying the necessary items to make it happen, later coding, then executing the attack on their demo phone.

“We believe we are here today and on the cusp of what we’re going to see in the future. If you think of what a smartphone has the capability to do, it’s the ultimate spying tool. Always powered on, always connected, travels around with us at all times,” Kurtz began.

“If you haven’t figured out privacy is dead, this is going to do it for you.”

The scenario was a competitor wanting to intercept calls and text messages on Kurtz’s phone and the attack was Webkit-based. Webkit is a tool used by Apple, Google and RIM to render HTML websites in Safari, Chrome and Android, and the latest versions of the BlackBerry, respectively.

The team bought 20 Webkit vulnerabilities – or bugs – in the underground for $US1400, spent approximately $US14,000 developing the malware code (“weaponisation phase”) and engineering root access, as well as building their own command and control centre to be able to harvest the fruits of their exploits.

The attack followed several steps: the first was a text message delivered to the smartphone appearing to come from the mobile carrier requesting a system update via a link. Once clicked, the drive-by link delivered the first part of the malware to the phone to elevate access (root) privilege, then cause it to crash.

It then automatically rebooted, executing the second part of the malware and hijacking the phone’s communications.

When Kurtz made a call to Alperovitch, the audience could hear the live conversation – as well as what was said before the call connected. On the command and control centre’s screen, a map positioned Kurtz and Alperovitch’s locations, the start of transmission, and the text of a subsequent text message Alperovitch sent Kurtz.

They said the attack did not require a phone be jailbroken and would work on any of the devices using Webkit – although this particular code was customised for the Adroid 2.2 (Froyo) version.

Kurtz told Fairfax Media such an attack would be possible on the iPhone because of the root access obtained via the browser vulnerability.

“We would have to get code execution via the browser, then escalate our privilege to root and totally bypass the app store [as we did] with Android.

“This is the point we are making: drive-by attacks will hit the phone just like the PCs,” he said.

But he said he didn’t want the audience to develop a bout of paranoia.

“The sky is not falling, these are very targeted attacks.”

BTBMYN

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

SPY CELL PHONE THAT FOLLOWS EVERY MOVE

Monday, September 19th, 2011

QUICK OVERVIEW ->

What Is Spy Phone Software?

How & why does it work?

How to spy on a cell phone using cell spy phone software?

Have you ever wanted to secretly spy on your spouse’s cell phone due to signs of cheating? Or perhaps you’re worried about your children, and want to monitor their cell phone for evidence of sexual activity or drug abuse?

Now you can, and it’s a lot easier to do than you think. All it takes is for you to purchase spyphone software available from several online cell phone spy vendors. Within minutes of your purchase, you can be reading your suspected cheating spouse’s sms messages, find out who they are calling or who is calling them, know where your children are, listen in on their surroundings or even intercept a live phone conversation.

**It’s worth mentioning that another option is to buy a cell phone with mobile spy software pre-installed for you. These phones are usually referred to as “spyphones” and are sold by many online spy phone vendors. However, watch out for the cost. I’ve seen some of these spyphones selling for $500 – $1,500, and all you are getting is an old cell phone with spy phone software pre-installed.

What is spy phone software?

Used by suspicious spouses who are looking for cheating spouse software, parents who want to monitor the kids, or employers who want to monitor phone usage by their staff, spy phone software such as Flexispy, Mobile Spy, MobiStealth is software built for cell phones that you download into a mobile(cell) phone of the person you want to spy on. Once installed, the software then secretly records all cell phone activity, giving you complete visibility of everything that occurs on the phone. Installation is done via the phone’s web browser, and usually takes anywhere from 10 – 30 minutes, depending on the skill level of the person installing the software.

How does spy phone software work?

After installation, the spy phone software is completely hidden from the user and starts to collect all available data such as SMS Messages, ingoing/outgoing call history, GPS coordinates, photos, videos, GPRS usage, etc. and uploads the collected data to a remote server using 3G, GPRS, or WiFi.

You then simply access the webpage of the spyphone vendor, enter your account details, and then you have full access to all the data collected 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, regardless where you are in the world. You can read all text messages (both incoming and outgoing), know who they are calling or who is calling them, where they were when the call was received, view photos stored on the phone, and more. Once armed with this information, you can use a reverse cell phone look up service and find out the identify of the person calling or sending messages.

Here is an overview of the entire process:


Imagine if you are a wife who suspects her husband is cheating on her . Now you can listen to their conversations, listen in on their surroundings (essentially be a fly on the wall), read all their incoming and outgoing text messages, find out who is calling them and where they actually are when they say, “Honey, I’m at the office.” or if you are a parent worried about their children and want to monitor their sms messages. No more guessing what happens when your loved ones leave the house.

IMPORTANT TIP! You MUST install the spy phone software on the cell phone you want to monitor. There is no way around this. No spy phone vendor on the market sells spy phone software with a remote installation feature. Don’t trust any company that says they offer spy phone software that does not require physical access to the phone. It DOES NOT exist!

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


INDUSTRIAL ESPIONAGE INVOLVES SPYING VIA MOBILE PHONE BUGS. NOW PLACED IN BUSCUIT TINS WHEN AT MEETINGS.

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

Placing your mobile phones in biscuit tins when attending meetings foils spyware & listeneing devices

A German chemicals company says its managers have begun keeping their mobile phones in biscuit tins during meetings in order to guard against industrial espionage.

“Experts have told us that mobile phones are being eavesdropped on more and more, even when they are switched off,” Alexandra Boy, spokeswoman for Essen-based speciality chemicals maker Evonik, said.

“The measure applies mostly when sensitive issues are being discussed, for the most part in research and development,” she said, confirming a report in business weekly Wirtschaftswoche.

Biscuit tins have a Faraday cage effect, she said, blocking out electromagnetic radiation and therefore preventing people from hacking into mobile phones, not only for calls but also to get hold of emails.

The firm, with 34,000 employees and sales of 13 billion euros ($17.7 billion), is not alone in wanting to defend itself against what experts warn are increasingly sophisticated methods of industrial espionage.

This month the German government opened a new national centre in Bonn to coordinate efforts not only to protect firms from espionage but also state infrastructure from cyberattacks.

AFP  Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


ANDROID SMART PHONES RECORD YOUR EVERY MOVE & KNOW WHERE YOU ARE & WHERE YOU HAVE BEEN

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Your smartphone

spies on you

for Google, Apple

Charles Arthur
April 25, 2011 – 8:08AM

With the iPhone tracker, researchers were able to map out the location data their phones were collecting.

Apple and Google are using smartphones running their software to build gigantic databases for location-based services, according to new research following revelations that iPhones and devices running Android collect location data about owners’ movements.

iPhones and Android smartphones swap data – which does not contain information directly identifying the user or the phone – back and forth with their respective companies.

The news has led some European governments to announce investigations into whether either company is breaking privacy laws.

Samy Kamkar, a hacker and researcher, has shown that Android phones, which run on software written by Google, collect the location data every few seconds and store it in a local file, but also transmit it to Google several times an hour.

This functionality is almost certainly used in any phone that provides mapping services, meaning that similar files will exist in some form on all smartphones, including those from Nokia and BlackBerry-maker RIM. It is not known whether these models synchronise data from the phone to the companies’ servers as well as storing it locally on the handset.

Sources familiar with Google’s systems said the location data was used to help the phones orient themselves by identifying nearby mobile phone masts and wi-fi sources and comparing them with Google’s own database, with which they are synchronised continually. The file is also updated so that if the mobile signal is interrupted – for example when the user is on a train and goes into a tunnel – it will be able to re-establish contact more quickly by knowing which towers are in the vicinity.

Apple and Google are collecting the data, which amounts to an international map of the locations and unique identities of cell towers and wi-fi networks, to improve targeting of their adverts based around mobile phones.

In a letter to the US congress last July, Apple confirmed it collected the data and said that, in order to be useful, “the databases [of tower and network locations] must be updated continuously”.

The value of location-based services, which feature advertising, is reckoned to be $US2.9bn already and forecast by the research group Gartner to grow to $US8.3bn by 2014.

In 2009, Google itself pointed to the value for users of having Android phones upload real-time location data to its servers, suggesting it could give “a pretty good picture of live traffic conditions”. It said: “We continuously combine this data and send it back to you for free in the Google Maps traffic layers. It takes almost zero effort on your part – just turn on Google Maps for mobile before starting your car.”

A Google spokesman said Android phones explicitly asked to collect anonymous location data when users turned them on.

Apple iPhones and iPads also ask whether users want to have “location services” turned on, and the iPhone licence has a passage that says Apple “and its partners and licensees” may transmit, collect, maintain, process and use location data, including the real-time geographic location of the iPhone, though it points out that this is anonymised and can be disabled by turning off the “location services” feature.

However, even if users disable location services, the iPhone and Android phones are believed to continue storing locations of cell towers and wi-fi networks in what is known as a “neighbour list”.

Google’s list is limited to the most recent 50 cell masts and 200 wi-fi networks, while Apple’s list is retained for up to a year. Sources close to Apple have suggested the long-term retention may be an error which it will correct in a future software update.

Privacy advocates fear that although the data is anonymised, the Apple data is not encrypted and could be misused by law enforcement or others who wanted to capture information about someone’s movements.

One security researcher, Alex Levinson of Katana Forensics, said on Thursday that US law enforcement had already made use of the location data recorded by the iPhone in investigations.

Some police forces, such as those in Michigan, already carry readers that can copy all the files from a smartphone even if it is protected with a password, and that it has been used on motorists stopped for minor traffic violations. The American Civil Liberties Union says such examination amounts to an “unreasonable search”, which would be illegal in the US.

In Germany, the Bavarian Agency for the Supervision of Data Protection said it would examine whether and why Apple’s devices were capturing the information, and that it had asked Apple for more information.

“If it is true that this information is being collected… without the approval and knowledge of the users, then it is definitely a violation of German privacy law,” Thomas Kranig, the agency’s director, told the New York Times.

Italy and France are expected to do the same. France’s data protection authority suggested that a major source of concern would be over whether Apple transferred any of the data to any commercial partners. “If the information is marketed without the knowledge of the consumer, it is much more serious,” Yann Padova of France’s CNIL said.

The Guardian

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha