Archive for the ‘HUMAN PHONE INPUT’ Category

IRIS ID SMART PHONE RELEASED IN JAPAN

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015
Published on 22 May 2015

Smartphone users in Japan can unlock their phones with the blink of an eye, as the country’s biggest mobile carrier NTT DoCoMo launches the world’s first iris recognition smartphone

Reuters

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Henry Sapiecha

NEW SMARTPHONE APP COULD WELL BE CALLED DOCTOR SMARTPHONE

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Monday, January 23, 2012

ARE WE ON THE WAY TO A DOCTOR SMARTPHONE?

(Reuters) – Tired of long waits at the hospital for medical tests? If Korean researchers have their way, your smartphone could one day eliminate that — and perhaps even tell you that you have cancer. 

A team of scientists at Korea Advanced Institute of Science of Technology (KAIST) said in a paper published in Angewandte Chemie, a German science journal, that touch screen technology can be used to detect biomolecular matter, much as is done in medical tests.

“It began from the idea that touch screens work by recognizing the electronic signs from the touch of the finger, and so the presence of specific proteins and DNA should be recognizable as well,” said Hyun-gyu Park, who with Byong-yeon Won led the study.

The touch screens on smartphones, PDAs or other electronic devices work by sensing the electronic charges from the user’s body on the screen. Biochemicals such as proteins and DNA molecules also carry specific electronic charges.

According to KAIST, the team’s experiments showed that touch screens can recognize the existence and the concentration of DNA molecules placed on them, a first step toward one day being able to use the screens to carry out medical tests.

“We have confirmed that (touch screens) are able to recognize DNA molecules with nearly 100 percent accuracy just as large, conventional medical equipment can and we believe equal results are possible for proteins,” Park told Reuters TV.

“There are proteins known in the medical world like the ones used to diagnose liver cancer, and we would be able to see the liver condition of the patient.”

The research team added that it is currently developing a type of film with reactive materials that can identify specific biochemicals, hoping this will allow the touch screens to also recognize different biomolecular materials.

But confirming that the touch screen can recognize the biomolecular materials, though key, is only the first step.

Since nobody would put blood or urine on a touch screen, the sample would be placed on a strip, which would then be fed into the phone or a module attached to the phone through what Park called an “entrance point.”

“The location and concentration of the sample would be recognized the same way the touch of the finger is recognized,” he added.

There are no details yet on a prospective timetable for making the phone a diagnostic tool, however.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

PHONE CLINIC HAS A NEW MEANING…STD TESTER

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

People will soon be able to tell if they have an STD by urinating on a small computer chip and inserting it into a mobile phone or computer, doctors and scientists in Britain claim.

But Australia’s foremost sexual health expert is sceptical about the idea, saying it may be a long time before such a product is consumer-ready.

The small devices, similar to pregnancy testing kits, will reportedly be able to give people a home diagnosis within minutes. Millions of pounds have been poured into the project to combat an STD epidemic in Britain, where infections reached a record 482,696 last year.

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“Your mobile phone can be your mobile doctor. It diagnoses whether you’ve got one of a range of STIs, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea and tells you where to go next to get treatment,” Dr Tariq Sadiq, the sexual health expert from the University of London who is leading the project, told The Guardian.

Sadiq said young people especially were embarrassed to see their doctor about STDs, which was making the situation worse.

Mobile phones are increasingly being used for health purposes, such as the remote monitoring of elderly people.

The Guardian reported that the developers of the rapid testing devices – which include experts in microbiology and phone operators like O2 – expected them to be sold for a pound each in vending machines in nightclubs, pharmacies and supermarkets.

The research has been given the thumbs up by Professor Noel Gill, the head of HIV and STIs at the British government’s Health Protection Agency, who said he hoped the application of new technology would reduce infections among young people. The HPA would coordinate large-scale evaluations of the technology within a network of collaborating STI clinics.

But Professor Basil Donovan, head of the sexual health program at the University of New South Wales’ National Centre in HIV Epidemiology & Clinical Research, said he maintained a “healthy scepticism” about the project.

“If they say that’s what they’re aspiring to that would be terrific, but unfortunately there’s no such test yet – at this stage it’s just fantasy,” Professor Donovan said in a phone interview.

“There was a paper published just a couple of weeks ago where they looked at all of the commercially available home testing kits for chlamydia and they were just a joke – if someone had chlamydia there was only a 10 per cent chance that the test would show it up.”

But Professor Donovan said he believed it was a “great idea”, concurring with Dr Sadiq that a big problem with current STD testing was that “it’s too embarrassing and too expensive to test everyone all the time”.

“I think in our lifetime it will happen and at the moment there are rapid home tests available for some conditions like HIV that are actually quite good,” he said.

Professor Adrian Mindel, sexual health medicine expert at the University of Sydney and the director of the sexually transmitted infections research centre at Westmead Hospital, said the STD problem could not be solved with technology alone.

“I don’t think the issue is the rapid test, it’s getting people to do the test that is the issue and that to me is the fundamental barrier rather than the technology,” he said.

“People have to identify themselves as being at risk and that is the difficulty at the moment.”

Professor Mindel said it was critical to educate young people about STDs, including that the majority of the infections don’t have symptoms and the infection may be transmitted even when symptoms aren’t present.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha