Archive for the ‘COUNTRIES’ Category

INTERNET SPEED MAP OF COUNTRIES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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Internet Connection Speed by Country

Posted: 19 Sep 2016 01:59 AM PDT

Internet Connection Speed by Country
(Click above image to see an interactive chart/map)
EUU
Henry Sapiecha

 

IS LEI JUN OF PHONE COMPANY XIAOMI CHINAS STEVE JOBS

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

China’s Xiaomi Technology is a fairytale for nerdy entrepreneurs.

Less than three years after its founding, the smartphone maker is valued at $US4 billion and evokes Apple-like adoration from its fans, some of whom are desperate enough to skip work for a shot at buying the latest product the day it goes on sale.

China’s media say I am China’s Steve Jobs, 

Founder Lei Jun dresses like the late Steve Jobs, in jeans and a black top. He has created a fervent fan base for Xiaomi’s moderately priced high-end smartphones by mimicking Apple’s marketing tactic of attaching an aura of exclusivity around its products.

Lei Jun, founder and CEO of China’s mobile company Xiaomi. Photo: Reuters

Before Xiaomi, the 42-year-old Lei was a key investor in China’s early internet scene, co-founding start-ups including Joyo.cn, which was eventually sold to Amazon.com, and the recently listed YY Inc.

Born in Xiantao, a small city in China’s central Hubei province better known for breeding Olympic gymnasts than billionaire technocrats, Lei brushes off comparisons to Jobs but concedes that the Apple visionary was an inspiration.

“China’s media say I am China’s Steve Jobs,” Lei said in an interview.

Dresses like the late Steve Jobs … Lei Jun. Photo: Reuters

“I will take this as a compliment but such kind of comparison brings us huge pressure,” said Lei, who grew up assembling radios as a hobby. “Xiaomi and Apple are two totally different companies. Xiaomi’s based on the internet. We are not doing the same thing as Apple.”

Hot sales and fans

Xiaomi has already sold 300,000 of its latest phone model, launched in October. The Xiaomi phone 2 has specifications similar to those of Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy S3 and Apple’s iPhone 5 but a top-of-the-line model sells for about $US370, half the price of an iPhone 5.

The late Steve Jobs. Photo: Getty Images

Unlike the big domestic smartphone players, such as Lenovo, ZTE and Huawei, which work with telecom carriers to sell a large volume of smartphones, Xiaomi sells most of its phones online and in small batches.

This small volume strategy creates pent-up demand that gives Xiaomi free marketing buzz. The first batch of 50,000 phones released on October 30 sold out in less than two minutes. Subsequent larger batches have also sold out in minutes.

Lei, who has nearly 4 million followers on China’s popular microblogging platform, Weibo, feeds the buzz by dangling teasers about new products and launch dates.

“We’re not a company that chases sales volume. We chase customer satisfaction. We look for ways to give the customer a great surprise,” Lei said.

His vision for an exclusive mid-tier brand that builds up incrementally, rather than swamping the market, has found financial backers. In June, Xiaomi raised $US216 million from Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund, the Government of Singapore Investment Corp, and a few of Lei’s friends, local media reported, giving it a valuation of $US4 billion.

“China is ripe for its own Apple, HTC or Samsung,” said Hans Tung, managing partner at Qiming Venture Partners, a venture firm backing Xiaomi. “The country is big enough, there are enough mobile internet users and mobile phone consumers. Therefore having its own mobile ecosystem built up by a domestic brand makes sense.”
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Xiaomi, which was founded in April 2010 and only started selling smartphones in October 2011, is on track to sell 7 million units this year, exceeding its target of 2 million.

Xiaomi is already profitable and is expected to rake in sales of up to 13 billion yuan ($1.9 billion) this year.

“Our product only sold for a year and hit sales of $2 billion. That is pretty impressive,” Lei said, adding Xiaomi was not considering an initial public offering within the next five years.

Tung said Xiaomi’s net margins were 10 per cent. This suggests its net profit could hit $US200 million this year.

Mo Xiaohua, a 24-year-old accountant, is a proud Xiaomi fan who only recently bought her first Xiaomi phone. For many who use Xiaomi phones, the customisable themes and the weekly updates are a big draw.

“I like Xiaomi because among China’s brand smartphones, its value is the best,” Mo said. “Now that we have such a good China branded phone, we need to support it.”

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‘Black back flats’

Xiaomi has its fair share of detractors who doubt it will have a happy ending. They say the smartphone game in China can only be won with wide distribution and high volume or a big brand with distinctive designs.

Xiaomi, whose attraction is its price and high technical specifications, does not win points for cutting-edge design.

“This is a world where people are now cranking out ‘black back flats’, that’s what all these phones are when you put 10 on the table… Xiaomi is not going to stick out,” said Michael Clendenin, managing director at RedTech Advisors. “In this world, the market is driven by two things: one is massive volume and two huge brands.”

ZTE and Huawei have set smartphone sales targets for this year at about 30 million and 60 million respectively. The firms have traditionally dominated the cheap low-end smartphone segment but have been pushing into the mid-price range.

ZTE said it launched 11 types of smartphones in the mid-price range of 1500-2500 yuan ($229-$382) this year, up from six last year. Apple released its mid-range tablet, the iPad Mini, in China on Friday.

“Xiaomi had great headline appeal a year ago… but the problem is now you have got guys like ZTE and Huawei and Meizu with phones that are priced in a similar range,” Clendenin said.

China is expected to surpass the United States as the world’s largest smartphone market this year with 165-170 million unit sales, up from 78 million last year, Gartner said.

Analysts said Xiaomi had to ramp up volume and address technical problems and a shortage of customer service centers if it wanted a shot at the big league.

“One of the challenges of being in the middle is that you can get squeezed,” said Duncan Clark, chairman of Beijing-based consultancy BDA.

Lei is resolute that he will prove the naysayers wrong.

“In this industry, I think the most important thing is to get love from your customers,” he said. “If you are popular with your customers, you succeed.

RTERCU
Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

KOREA LOOKING TO BUILD ITS OWN MOBILE PHONE PLATFORM NETWORK

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

Seoul seeks to build

mobile platform

By Christian Oliver in Seoul

South Korea’s government has called on Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics to join it in a consortium to develop a homegrown mobile phone operating system, a sign that Seoul fears Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility could pose a long-term threat to two of its biggest companies.

Samsung and LG are the world’s second- and third-biggest makers of mobile handsets but their software is much weaker than their hardware. Their most successful smartphones have relied on Google’s Android operating system.

South Korea admitted that it could be strategically dangerous to keep relying on Google for software as the US firm builds up its own ability to make hardware, which is Korea’s strength.

Since Google’s acquisition, there have been fears that a tighter integration of Android with Motorola’s mobile devices will make for a stronger competitor to third parties such as Samsung and LG. Google insists it will continue to work with independent handset makers on Android devices.

Seoul’s ministry of the knowledge economy said on Wednesday that it would announce details of its plan in October. The ministry said it had invited Samsung and LG to take part but that small and medium-sized IT enterprises should form some 50 per cent of the consortium.

While the ministry has not decided on the nature of the operating system, it said it wanted something that could ultimately compete with Google’s Chrome and is considering a cloud-based system to allow the sharing of data across smartphones, personal computers and laptops.

“In the long term, we cannot go on like this by solely relying on Google,” Kim Jae-hong, a deputy commerce minister, told reporters.

Samsung declined to comment on the government plan, saying the idea was in “initial stages”. LG said it was “willing to listen” to the government’s ideas.

Telecommunications analysts said the government’s plan was impractical or unlikely to succeed because South Korea had too much ground to make up in software, and argued that handset makers should look to buy a foreign operating system or diversify their OS suppliers.

Chang Sea-jin, a professor at Singapore National University, said the government initiative was a “long shot” and looked more like a programme to help struggling SMEs than to boost Samsung and LG. He argued that Samsung, the world’s biggest technology company by sales, should instead look to buy a foreign OS maker.

“In the short term, it is more reasonable to balance [Microsoft’s] Windows and Android and not rely on Google,” he said.

Samsung, whose Galaxy smartphones are the main challenger to Apple’s iPhone, already has a homegrown software system called Bada but it is aimed at low- to mid-end smartphones. Samsung’s blue-riband smartphones use Google’s Android. Samsung on Wednesday launched new Galaxy handsets aimed at increasing sales in emerging markets.

Although South Korea’s government regularly tries to steer companies, analysts said software design was a field in which Seoul was out of its depth.

“I understand the government’s desire to seek solutions with the threat of a rapidly changing market but this is the wrong direction,” said Greg Roh, analyst at HMC Investment Securities. “This should be left to the market.”

?Apple won an injunction in a Dutch court on Wednesday to stop Samsung from marketing three smartphone models in some European countries after alleging a breach of patents, Reuters reports from Amsterdam. Apple and Samsung are locked in a bruising patent fight in the US, Europe and Asia, as they jostle for the top spot in the smartphone market.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

APPLE HAS GRIEF WITH CHINESE AUTHORITIES

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Green group

accuses Apple of

not being green

January 21, 2011 – 9:33AM

iPhone maker Apple was criticised by Chinese green groups for lax corporate oversight of its suppliers in China, leading to poor environmental and work safety standards that poisoned dozens of factory workers.

Apple, which announced blockbuster profits and a dazzling outlook for iPhone and iPad sales earlier this week, continues to be dogged by accusations of aggressive pricing and secretive supply chain management in Chinese factories where they now assemble most of their products.

“We’ve found that Apple isn’t honouring its commitment in ensuring its supply chain’s work safety and environmental responsibility and giving dignity and respect to the workers,” said Ma Jun, of the Institute of Public & Environmental Affairs (IPE) which published a detailed report on Apple supply chain malpractice this week, in conjunction with other green groups.

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“[Apple] only care about the price and quality [of their products] and not the environmental and social responsibility issues. In some ways they drive the suppliers to cut corners to win their contracts,” Ma said.

Apple said it had a rigorous auditing regime and all its suppliers were monitored and investigated regularly.

“Our supplier responsibility reports document the progress of our extensive auditing program since 2006,” an Apple spokeswoman said.

Foxconn suicides

Last year, Apple’s main China supplier Foxconn was hit by over a dozen worker suicides that critics blamed on harsh factory conditions and a militaristic culture. Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs has denied the allegations, saying that Foxconn is not a sweatshop.

Many Western multinationals – including toymaker Mattel which suffered a toxic lead paint scandal in 2007 – have struggled to regulate product quality across scores of suppliers in knotted Chinese supply chains, but the report said Apple’s standards fell far short of its status as a leading global brand.

“It’s not easy to control [the supply chain] but peer brands are doing a lot more [than Apple] to deal with this,” said Ma.

The nine-month survey “The other face of Apple” found that at least 49 factory workers in eastern China working in factories assembling products for Apple, had fallen ill.

Lianjian Technology in the eastern city of Suzhou which the green group claims is one of Apple’s major touchscreen suppliers, was accused of using N-Hexane, a toxic solvent, to clean touch screens, leading to at least 47 factory workers being poisoned.

Another company named by the green group as a user of N-Hexane was Taiwan-based touchscreen chip maker Wintek. A Wintek spokesman said it had stopped using the chemical and all its employees had recovered.

“Apple’s lack of responsiveness eventually made us quite shocked. It’s the whole complacency that it doesn’t have to be accountable to the NGOs, to the communities, even to the poisoned workers,” Ma said.

Reuters

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha